Monday, September 17, 2007

Pictures From Jack Powers 70th Birthday by Steve Glines






Top Photo: Jack Power's son.

2nd from Top: Jack Powers and Margaret Nairn

3rd from Top: ( Right to Left) Doug Holder, Arthur Polonsky, and Sidewalk Sam

4th from Top: ( Right to Left) Rose Gardina, Kip Tiernan, Deb Priestly and Doug Holder

http://mail.is-cs.com/JACK/

9 comments:

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mooskietx said...

You need to come see the gyms in Boston

mooskietx said...

You need to come see the gyms in Boston

Kenmoto said...

Fond memories of Jack helping my bunch of anti-war navy buddies publish Catharsis. Learning how to paste up the copy in Jack's apartment up over Stone Soup on Cambridge Street. Remember Jack discussing politics, teaching me so much, while going about his work at Goodspeeds Book Shop. Over the years I've admired his deep commitment to social issues and felt guilty at not being so committed myself.


Happy 70th Birthday Jack! (3 years late)


http://kenmoto.blogspot.com

David said...

Rest in peace, great supporter of poetry in Boston and Cambridge. You will be missed. My first reading ever was a Stone Soup one, in the shadow of the old Charles St. jail on Cambridge St. on Beacon Hill. I won't forget.

-- David Krancher

Whaling City Review said...

During the 70´s we who were coming into our voices on Cambridge Street in Boston got to hear and meet Robert Bly, Bob Creeley, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Charley Shively, John Wieners and so many more of pour Pantheon...all because of our resident mensch, brother Jack Powers. Sleep well, sweet prince.

C.C. Arshagra said...

The number of lives he touched and creatively inspired to be and become the voices of public poetry is immeasurable. He stood tall when many fell to appease the popular arts for the politics of self. Always did he care for the smallest of voices dying to be heard. He gave more to many others and less to the call of his own soul's trials. And not just for poets, but also to mimes, music, and the humanities. The best of his life's work will live on through thousands of voices freed via the stage of his life time here.

C.C. Arshagra ~ October 15th, 2010

C.C. Arshagra said...

The number of lives he touched and creatively inspired to be and become the voices of public poetry is immeasurable. He stood tall when many fell to appease the popular arts for the politics of self. Always did he care for the smallest of voices dying to be heard. He gave more to many others and less to the call of his own soul's trials. And not just for poets, but also to mimes, music, and the humanities. The best of his life's work will live on through thousands of voices freed via the stage of his life time here.

C.C. Arshagra ~ October 15th, 2010

C.C. Arshagra said...

The number of lives he touched and creatively inspired to be and become the voices of public poetry is immeasurable. He stood tall when many fell to appease the popular arts for the politics of self. Always did he care for the smallest of voices dying to be heard. He gave more to many others and less to the call of his own soul's trials. And not just for poets, but also to mimes, music, and the humanities. The best of his life's work will live on through thousands of voices freed via the stage of his life time here.

C.C. Arshagra ~ October 15th, 2010